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Equity And Option Trader

#InvestingUniversity #TradingUniversity #InvestmentIdeas #MutualFunds Nine #PersonalFinance Rules we all should better know. (It's a WhatsApp Forward but a useful one, so sharing here) 1) Rule of 72 (Double Your Money) 2) Rule of 70 (Inflation) 3) 4% Withdrawal Rule 4) 100 Minus Age Rule 5) 10, 5, 3 Rule 6) 50-30-20 Rule 7) 3X Emergency Rule 8) 40℅ EMI Rule 9) Life Insurance Rule 1) Rule of 72 No. of yrs required to double your money at a given rate, U just divide 72 by interest rate Eg, if you want to know how long it will take to double your money at 8% interest, divide 72 by 8 and get 9 yrs At 6% rate, it will take 12 yrs At 9% rate, take 8 yrs 2) Rule of 70 Divide 70 by current inflation rate to know how fast the value of your investment will get reduced to half its present value. Inflation rate of 7% will reduce the value of your money to half in 10 years. 3) 4% Rule for Financial Freedom Corpus Reqd = 25 times estimated Annual Expenses. Say Annual Expense > 50 years is 500,000 then corpus with you required is 1.25 cr. 50% into fixed income & 50% into equity. Withdraw 4% every yr This rule works for 96% of time in 30 yr period 4) 100 minus your age rule This rule is used for asset allocation. Subtract your age from 100 to find out, how much of your portfolio should be allocated to equities Age is 30 so (100 - 30 = 70) Equity : 70% Debt : 30% Age is 60 so (100 - 60 = 40) Equity : 40% Debt : 60% 5) 10-5-3 Rule One should have reasonable returns expectations 10℅ Rate of return - Equity / Mutual Funds 5℅ - Debts ( Fixed Deposits or Other Debt instruments) 3℅ - Savings Account 6) 50-30-20 Rule - about allocation of income to expense Divide your income into 50℅ - Needs (Groceries, rent, emi, etc) 30℅ - Wants (Entertainment, vacations, etc) 20℅ - Savings (Equity, MFs, Debt, FD, etc) At least try to save 20℅ of your income. 7) 3X Emergency Rule Always put at least 3 times your monthly income in Emergency funds for emergencies such as Loss of employment, medical emergency, etc. 3 X Monthly Income In fact, one can have around 6 X Monthly Income in liquid or near liquid assets to be on a safer side 8) 40℅ EMI Rule Never go beyond 40℅ of your income into EMIs. Say you earn, 50,000 per month. So you should not have EMIs more than 20,000 . This Rule is generally used by Finance companies to provide loans. You can use it to manage your finances. 9) Life Insurance Rule Always have Sum Assured as 20 times of your Annual Income 20 X Annual Income Say you earn 5 Lacs annually, U should atleast have 1 crore insurance by following this Rule.

Equity And Option Trader

1⃣ Rule of 72 No. of yrs required to double your money at a given rate, just divide 72 by interest rate. If you want to know how long it will take to double your money at 8% interest, divide 72 by 8 and get 9 yrs. At 6% rate, it will take 12 yrs At 9% rate, it will take 8 yrs 2⃣Rule of 114 No. of years required to triple your money at a given rate, divide 114 by the interest rate. For ex: If you want to know how long it will take to triple your money at 12% interest, divide 114 by 12 and get 9.5 years. At a 6% interest rate, it will take 19yrs. 3⃣Rule of 144 No. of years required to, quadruple your money at a given rate, just divide 144 by interest rate. Eg: If you want to know how long it will take to quadruple your money at 12% interest, divide 144 by 12 and get 12 yrs. At a 6% interest rate, it will take 24yrs. 4⃣Rule of 70 Divide 70 by the current inflation rate to know how fast the value of your investment will be reduced to half its present value. The inflation rate of 7% will reduce the value of your money to half in 10 years. 5⃣4% Rule for Financial Freedom Corpus Reqd- 25*Annual Expenses Eg- the annual expense is 500,000 then the corpus required to retire is 1.25 cr. Put 50% into fixed income & 50% into equity. Withdraw 4% every yr, i.e.5 lac. This rule works for 96% of the time in 30 yr period 6⃣100 minus your age rule This rule is used for asset allocation. Subtract your age from 100 to find out, how much of your portfolio should be allocated to equities. Age 30 Equity: 70% Debt: 30% Age 60 Equity: 40% Debt: 60 7⃣10-5-3 Rule One should have reasonable return expectations. 10℅ Rate of return - Equity / Mutual Funds 5℅ - Debts ( Fixed Deposits or Other Debt instruments) 3℅ - Savings Account 8⃣50-30-20 Rule - Allocation Divide your income into 50℅ - Needs - Groceries, rent, EMI 30℅ - Wants - Entertainment, vacations, etc 20℅ - Savings - Equity, MFs, Debt, FD, etc At least try to save 20℅ of your income. You can definitely save more. 9⃣3X Emergency Rule Always put at least 3 times your monthly income in Emergency funds for emergencies such as loss of employment, medical emergency, etc. 3 X Monthly Income You can have around 6 X Monthly Income to be on a safer side. 🔟40℅ EMI Rule Never go beyond 40℅ of your income into EMIs. Say you earn, 50,000 per month. So you should not have EMIs of more than 20,000. This Rule is generally used by Finance companies to provide loans. You can use it to manage your finances. #NIFTYBANK #NIFTY50 #MacroEconomy #PersonalFinance

TRADE WiTH TREND

What if you buy a term plan in your 20s rather than in your 30s? (this is assuming that you have dependent family members). Here's how you can benefit by buying the term cover early: ➡️ Super-Low Premium Buying the same 1 Cr term cover at age 25 will cost you lower premiums than at age 35. ➡️ Tax Saver Benefits Section 80C allows you to save on your taxes by decreasing your taxable income with the amount of premiums paid. Why not save taxes early in your career? And of course, the primary intention of insurance is to cover the financial risk. The earlier you do this for your family, the better it is. Do you already have it or no? #PersonalFinance

Anupam Roongta

Suripeddi Koundinya

When more is better: ➕ Sources of Income. ➕ Cash flows. ➕ Investments. When less is better: ➖ Debt. ➖ Taxes. ➖ Monthly expenses. #PersonalFinance

Anupam Roongta

Excerpts from The psychology of money: Morgan Housel. 1. Do the actions we take around our decisions on money depends on our knowledge about finance? 2. How do we change our decision making process around money which is based on our past experiences. 3. Luck and risk - what role do they have in our success or faliure? 4. Why should we not copy the actions of one individual? 5. How to formulate your own recipe for success? Our actions around money are largely dependent upon how we have grown up in our family and in our economy. With same amount of information two individuals would react differently to situation. A person born in poor family may give higher weightage to saving plan than a person who is used to getting all riches in life People reaction to stock market largely depends on the phase of the stock market which they have seen closely. Though it is difficult to change our behaviour around money, but getting to know about, understanding the reasons behind our behaviour and reading about the practices which have yielded results most of the time in the past can help us change our behaviour. People who don't acknowledge role of luck and risk in our lives are missing a part of the puzzle. Are the people who are successful are just the result of right decision and right skills? Are the people who have not got the result they desire are poor decision maker or Lazy? Not all sucess is due to hard work and not all poverty is due to laziness. We can't quantify this equation but luck and risk always play a part. Bill Gates, Waren Buffet were doing the right things at the right time and they got lucky to be successful. There was one more kid named Kent Evans working with Bill Gates in early years who was equally or more tallented than Gates, but he couldn't make it because he died in mountaineering expedition which had very little risk of life.( One in million) When we study just one individual and try to copy his actions to become successful in that field we might not get the same results as he has got. The reason being both situations are different and it's difficult to separate out what was mere luck or risk and what was dependent on the decision making and right skills. So what do we do to build our own recipe. The answer lies in studying a greater set of data, so that we can distill out the right set of skill and decision making process which generally results in success. It means focussing less on individuals or specific case studies and relying more on broad patterns. Even then after doing all things right remember to give due respect to luck and risk and thank the universe for making you lucky. Bhagvat Gita teaches us to focus on the deeds and not the results. It's the journey that matters more than the peak of the mountain 🏔️. Reaching the peak is not entirely in your hand. Would love to get your comments on it!! #PersonalFinance #InvestingUniversity

Nik

Shubham Birar

KrisDom Investor

In 2032, you have: ➡️ Zero debt. ➡️ Fat retirement savings. ➡️ Big investment portfolio. ➡️ 3 passive income sources. And it's all because of the actions you took in 2022. #PersonalFinance #InvestingUniversity

Anupam Roongta

Mohit Jain

Folding 0.1 mm thick sheet of paper 42 times will be enough to reach the Moon. That's the power of compounding. ₹100 at 15% per annum for 10 years becomes ₹400. ₹1000 compounded again for the next 10 years becomes 4,000. Just imagine if you compounded for 10 more years. You will make it 16,000. 15% for 10 years is 4 times. 15% for 20 years is 16 times. 15% for 30 years is 66 times. 15% for 40 years is 267 times. Morale of the post: Start investing as early as you can. #InvestingUniversity #PersonalFinance

Anupam Roongta

Mohit Jain

TAXATION OF INCOME FROM EQUITY MARKET 📣 STCG (Short-Term Capital Gains) • If equity shares listed on a stock exchange are sold within 12 months of purchase, the seller may make short term capital gain or incur a short-term capital loss. The seller makes short-term capital gain when shares are sold at a price higher than the purchase price • Short-term capital gains are taxable at 15% LTCG (Long-Term Capital Gains) • If equity shares listed on a stock exchange are sold after 12 months of purchase, the seller may make a long-term capital gain or incur a long-term capital loss. Before the introduction of Budget 2018, the long-term capital gain made on the sale of equity shares or equity-oriented units of mutual funds was exempt from tax • The Financial Budget of 2018 took away this exemption. Henceforth, if a seller makes a long-term capital gain of more than INR 1 lakh on the sale of equity shares or equity-oriented units of a mutual fund, the gain made will attract a long term capital gains tax of 10% (plus applicable cess) STT (Securities Transaction Tax) • STT is applicable on all equity shares sold or bought on a stock exchange. The above tax implications are only applicable for shares listed on a stock exchange. Any sale/purchase on a stock exchange is subject to STT. Therefore, these tax implications discussed above are only for shares on which STT is paid #InvestmentIdeas #InvestingUniversity #PersonalFinance

Geranish

Shubham Birar

Investment Ideas for individuals in their 20’s.💡 First steps!👣 1️⃣ Learn the basics : It is a true but sad fact that important subjects such as money, investing and personal finance are not taught a lot in school. So, we as individuals have to put in the time and effort to learn these super important and essential financial skills on our own. 📍Key areas of personal finance for individual’s in their 20’s - Budgeting 📒 - Saving💰 - Investment Products 📈 - Taxes 🧾 2️⃣ Start Investing early : Do not delay the process of starting to invest. Time is of the essence here and every minute counts. Make a plan today. Don’t focus only on the planning process alone, take actions too. - An emergency fund can be the first step towards investing. A fund that covers expenses for 9 to 12 months. 🏦 - Start with SIP’s in a Mutual Fund by investing amounts as low as Rs. 500.💵 3️⃣ Set Goals and create a Financial Plan : Outline your Money Goals - Immediate Money : Food, rent, utility, medicals🥪🏥💊📑 - Mid term Money : Home down payments, travel, wedding 🏠✈️💒 - Long term Money : Retirement funds, future children’s education etc 👵🏻🧓🏻 Create a Financial Plan - Investment Tenure (How long to invest) 🕐 - Investment Amount (How much to invest) 🤔 - Investment Products (Where to invest)🧐 4️⃣ Invest in Equities (But learn more about it first) For long term goals, a fixed deposit might not suffice. So, investing in equities is the way to go. Although there’s a significant risk involved but learning and making calculated risks is probably easier in your 20’s than in your 50’s. 5️⃣ Don’t shy away from other investment alternatives It is a good practise to diversify your investments. So, as the saying goes - don’t put all your🥚 in one 🧺. Invest in real estate, precious metals, commodities, bonds etc too. Hope this article helps fellow young adults gain a decent perspective on how to start investing! 🙂 #InvestingUniversity #PersonalFinance

dewdrop

Kamlesh Gheewala

Why you will never be wealthy? Potential reasons: ➡️ Buying a luxury car on EMI. ➡️ Inappropriate health insurance. ➡️ Prefer FDs over Equity. ➡️ No long term vision. But HEELS can fix it: Health Insurance cover = annual income or more. Emergency Funds = 6-12 times of your monthly expense. EMI = Less than 25% of your monthly salary. Life Insurance cover = 20+ times of your annual income. Saving (monthly) = 20%+ of your monthly salary. What challenges are you facing with investments? #PersonalFinance

Anupam Roongta

Stock Market Core

It is easy to make 1Lakh from 50k. Even crypto hodlers did it. Very hard to make 50 lakh from 25 Lakh It needs behavioral strengths a. courage to invest 25 Lakh b. conviction to stay invested through thick and thin c. confidence to not sell at 50-70% when you can make 10-15 Lakh If you have not achieved the later, do not think about quitting ur job #InvestingUniversity #PersonalFinance

Intrinsic Value

SLBM (Stock Lending and Borrowing Mechanism) is a legally approved medium for lending and borrowing securities. It is a system in which a trader can borrow shares that they do not already own or lend the stocks they own. All market participants, including retail (except Qualified Foreign Investors) in the Indian securities market, have been permitted to lend/borrow securities but under the supervision of – NCL (NSE clearing limited) and BOISL (BSE clearing corporation). There are mainly two parties involved in SLBM transactions – • Borrowers • Lenders For lenders, it provides an opportunity to earn returns on their idle portfolios if they intend to hold those stocks in their portfolios for the long term. At the same time, it allows the borrower to use this mechanism for their advantage, like - to cover short positions: to avoid settlement failure and mispricing in options. In this SLBM process, to maintain the compliance level, both parties have to meet certain criteria like the lender depositing 25% of the shares in advance and the borrower depositing 125% of the value of stocks he wishes to borrow a margin amount for safety. Overall, it has various advantages like – Additional income to the lender from an idle portfolio, Less risk due to a robust compliance process by the authorities. #InvestmentIdeas #InvestingUniversity #PersonalFinance

Vinidhan

Some people don't like numbers. But tracking these basic numbers is an essential part: 👇 ➡️ Keep a track of assets v/s debt, plot a chart in excel if you have a loan. ➡️ Keep a track of your saving rate. Savings Rate = Monthly Savings / Monthly Earnings ➡️ Keep a track of your investment rate. Invest Rate = Monthly Investment / Monthly Earnings And keep improving this ratio month by month, even if it is by 0.5% per month. Cheat Code: If you're in your early 20s with no liabilities, investment rate can be over 50%. #PersonalFinance

Anupam Roongta

LIFE INSURANCE Life insurance is a policy or cover that allows the policyholders to ensure financial independence for their family members after death. Assume you are the sole provider for your family, supporting your spouse and children. Your death would financially devastate the entire family in such an event. Life insurance policies prevent this from happening by providing financial assistance to your family in the event of your death. Life Insurance Policy Types There are primarily seven different types of insurance policies when it comes to life insurance. They are as follows: Term Plan - A term plan's death benefit is only available for a set period of time, such as 40 years from the date of policy purchase. Endowment Plan - Endowment plans are life insurance policies in which a portion of your premiums are applied to the death benefit, and the remainder is invested by the insurance company. Endowment policies provide assistance in the form of maturity benefits, death benefits, and periodic bonuses. Unit Linked Insurance Plans, or ULIPs, are similar to endowment plans in that a portion of your insurance premiums are invested in mutual funds, while the remainder is used to pay the death benefit. Whole Life Insurance - As the name implies, such policies provide life insurance coverage for an individual's entire life, rather than just a set period of time. Some insurers may limit the term of whole life insurance to 100 years. Child's Plan - An investment and insurance policy that provides financial assistance to your children for the rest of their lives. Following the death of parents, the death benefit is available as a lump-sum payment. Money-Back Policies - These policies pay out a certain percentage of the plan's sum assured at regular intervals. This is referred to as a survival benefit. Retirement plans, also known as pension plans, are a combination of investment and insurance. A portion of the premiums is used to build the policyholder's retirement corpus. This is available as a lump sum or monthly payment after the policyholder retires. Life Insurance Advantages If you have a life insurance policy, you can take advantage of the following benefits. Tax Breaks - If you pay life insurance premiums, you are eligible for tax breaks under Sections 80(C) and 10(10D) of the Income Tax Act in India. Thus, you can save a significant amount of money in taxes by purchasing a life insurance policy. Encourages the Habit of Saving - Because you must pay policy premiums, purchasing such an insurance policy promotes the habit of saving money. Secures Your Family's Financial Future - The policy ensures your family's financial independence even after death. Aids in Retirement Planning - Certain life insurance policies can also be used as investment vehicles. #InvestmentIdeas #InvestingUniversity #PersonalFinance

Vinidhan

*50 Transactions to be reported in New Annual Information Statement (AIS)* *So be alert & careful in misuse of PAN Number* The Income Tax Department has announced the roll-out of a new statement namely Annual Information Statement (AIS) which would provide you with almost all details about your financial transactions during the year. So far, the Income Tax Department has been issuing Form 26AS to provide information related to taxable income and tax deducted at source (TDS), which will now be replaced with the Annual Information Statement (AIS). The new AIS statement will provide comprehensive information of the taxpayer and will be significantly useful while preparing the tax return. The information will be provided in AIS after removing duplicate information and taxpayers can download such information in PDF, JSON, CSV formats. A taxpayer can submit online feedback if the information is erroneous or refers to another person/year, or is duplicate Here’s the list of Top 50 Transactions to be reported in the New Annual Information Statement. *1.Salary* Employer submits detailed breakup of salary, perquisites, profits in lieu of salary etc paid to the employee in Annexure II of the TDS statement (24Q) of the last quarter. This information is also provided by the employer to the employee (taxpayer) in Part B (Annexure) of Form 16. AIS displays all the financial transactions such as, salary income, dividend income, interest income from saving/fixed deposits, sale and purchase of securities, etc. With the help of all such financial information, it would be easy for a taxpayer to report the correct information in the income tax return *2. Rent Received* Tenants responsible for paying rent are liable to deduct tax at source on payment of rent. Deductor reports details of amount paid/credited, date of payment, details of Tax deduction made etc. in Form 26Q. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. Tenant (Individual/HUF) paying a rent of more than 50,000 is liable to deduct tax while making payment to the landlord. Tenant reports details of rent paid amount paid/credited, property details, date of payment and tax deduction details etc. pertaining to rent paid in Form26QC. *3. Dividends* Dividend paid/declared by all companies (reporting entity) is reported under Statement of Financial Transactions (SFT). Company paying/distributing dividend is liable to deduct TDS from the amount paid subject to the threshold applicable in the act and report through form 26Q (quarterly statement). This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *4. Interest from savings bank* Interest paid/credited/accrued on saving account is reported under Statement of Financial Transactions (SFT). *5. Interest from deposit* Bank/deductor at the time paying/crediting interest on deposits is liable to deduct tax from deposit holder paid subject to the threshold applicable in the act. This information is reported by the Bank/deductor in form 26Q (quarterly statement). This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *6. Interest from others* Interest paid/credited/accrued on others (other than savings account, term deposit, recurring deposit) is reported under Statement of Financial Transactions (SFT). Bank/deductor at the time paying/crediting other interest (interest on securities) is liable to deduct tax from deposit holder paid subject to the threshold applicable in the act. This information is reported by the Bank/deductor in form 26Q (quarterly statement). This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A *7. Interest from income tax refund* Interest received on Income Tax Refund in the financial year is liable to be taxed as Income from other sources. *8. Rent on plant & machinery* Tenant paying rent is liable to deduct tax at applicable rate as per the Act from rent paid. Details of rent on Plant & Machinery is reported by the deductor in TDS form 26Q. Tenant furnishes the details of rent paid on quarterly basis. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *9. Winnings from lottery or crossword puzzle* Payer is liable to deduct tax at applicable rate as per act from winnings from lottery or crossword puzzle etc. Information about winnings is reported by payer in TDS form 26Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis. Income is taxable at special rate. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *10. Winnings from horse race* Payer is liable to deduct tax at applicable rate as per act from winnings from Horse race. Information about winnings is reported by payer in TDS form 26Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis and is chargeable to tax at special rate. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *11. Receipt of accumulated balance of PF from employer u/s 111* Employer/recognised provided fund reports information about accumulated balance due to an employee in form 26Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis and is chargeable to tax at special rate. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *12. Interest from infrastructure debt fund* Information relating to interest paid is reported by payer in form 27Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis and is chargeable to tax at special rate. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *13. Interest from specified company by a non-resident u/s 115A(1)(a)(iiaa)* Information relating to interest paid is reported by payer in form 27Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis and is chargeable to tax at special rate. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *14. Interest on bonds and government securities* Information relating to interest paid is reported by payer in form 27Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis and is chargeable to tax at special rate. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *15. Income in respect of units of non-resident u/s 115A(1)(a)(iiab)* Information about income in respect of units of Non Resident is reported by payer in form 27Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis and is chargeable to tax at special rate. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *16. Income and long-term capital gain from units by an offshore fund u/s 115AB(1)(b)* Information about income and long-term capital gain from units payable to an off shore fund is reported by payer in form 27Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis and is chargeable to tax at special rate. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *17. Income and long-term capital gain from foreign currency bonds or shares of Indian companies u/s 115AC* Information about income and long-term capital gain from foreign currency bonds or shares of Indian companies is reported by payer in form 27Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis and is chargeable to tax at special rate. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *18. Income of foreign institutional investors from securities u/s 115AD(1)(i)* Information about income of foreign institutional investors from securities is reported by payer in form 27Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis and is chargeable to tax at special rate. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *19. Insurance commission* Information about insurance commission received is reported by the payer in Form 26Q on a quarterly basis. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *20. Receipts from life insurance policy* Receipts from life insurance policy are exempt under section 10(10D) subject to conditions specified therein. If such conditions are not met, the receipts become taxable and tax is also deducted u/s 194DA. The information is reported by the payer in Form 26Q on a quarterly basis. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *21. Withdrawal of deposits under national savings scheme* Withdrawals from NSS are taxable. Tax is also deducted on such withdrawals and reported in Form 26Q by the payer on a quarterly basis. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *22. Receipt of commission etc. on sale of lottery tickets* Commission on lottery business is subject to tax deduction under section 194G. The payer reports such information in Form 26Q on a quarterly basis. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A *23. Income from investment in securitization trust* Income from investment made in securitization trust is subject to tax deduction. The payer reports such information in Form 27Q on a quarterly basis. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *24. Income on account of repurchase of units by MF/UTI* Receipt of income on account of repurchase of units by MF/UTI is subject to tax deduction under section 194F. The payer reports such information in Form 26Q on a quarterly basis. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *25. Interest or dividend or other sums payable to government* Income from interest or dividend or other sums payable is not subject to tax deduction. The payer reports such information in Form 26Q on a quarterly basis. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A *26. Payment to non-resident sportsmen or sports association u/s 115BBA* Information pertaining to amount paid to non-resident sportsmen or sports association is reported by deductor in form 27Q. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *27. Sale of land or building* Sales consideration of immovable property transferred is reported under Statement of Financial Transactions (SFT). The information will be shown in AIS of all sellers to enable submission of feedback. Sale of immovable property is also reported in Form 61 where PAN is not furnished by the transacting party. PAN is populated based on aadhaar and other attributes of the person. Information related to receipts under specified agreement is reported by person making payment for specified agreement entered into. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *28. Receipts from transfer of immovable property* Information related to receipts from transfer of immovable property is reported by buyer of property in Form 26QB. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16B. *29. Sale of vehicle* Sale of motor vehicle is reported in Form 61 where PAN is not furnished by the transacting party. PAN is populated based on aadhaar and other attributes of the person. *30. Sale of securities and units of mutual fund* In the SFT reporting of depository transactions, the estimated sale consideration for the debit transaction is determined on the best possible available price of the asset with the depository (e.g. end of day price). The taxpayer will be able to modify the sales consideration and other related information before filing the return. In the SFT reporting of depository transactions, the estimated sale consideration for the debit transaction is determined on the best possible available price of the asset with the depository (e.g. end of day price). The taxpayer will be able to modify the sales consideration and other related information before filing the return. *31. Off market debit transactions* In the SFT reporting of depository transactions, the depository reports details of off market debit transactions. The value of transaction is computed on the basis of end of day price of the security. In case, the consideration is available, the same is also shown. *32. Off market credit transactions* In the SFT reporting of depository transactions, the depository reports details of off market credit transactions. The value of transaction is computed on the basis of end of day price *33. Business receipts* Information pertaining to amount paid to contractor is reported by contractee in form 26Q. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. Information pertaining to amount paid to the service provider is reported by recipient of services in form 26Q. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A *34. Business expenses* Information pertaining to purchase of alcoholic liquor is reported by tax collector in TCS form 27EQ (quarterly statement). This information is provided by the collector to the taxpayer in Form 27D. *35. Rent payments* Information is reported by person making payment in form 26QC. This information is provided by the deductor to the taxpayer in Form 16C *36. Miscellaneous payments* Information is reported by person making payment in form 26QD. This information is provided by the deductor to the taxpayer in Form 16D. Purchase of bank drafts or pay orders may be reported in Form 61 if PAN is not furnished by the transacting party. PAN is populated based on aadhaar and other attributes of the person *37. Cash deposits* Information pertaining to cash deposits in an account other than current account is reported by reporting entity in form 61A. The information will be shown in AIS of all account holders to enable submission of feedback. Information pertaining to cash deposits in current account is reported by reporting entity in form 61A. The information will be shown in AIS of all account holders to enable submission of feedback. *38. Cash withdrawals* Information pertaining to Cash withdrawals from current account is reported by reporting entity in form 61A. The information will be shown in AIS of all account holders to enable submission of feedback. Sometimes, cash withdrawals from accounts other than current account are reported by the Reporting Entity in SFT-004. The information will be shown in AIS of all account holders to enable submission of feedback. Information pertaining to Cash withdrawals is reported by reporting entity through TDS statement 26Q. This information is provided by the deductor to the taxpayer in Form 16A. *39. Cash payments* Information pertaining to Cash payments for goods and services is reported by reporting entity in form 61A. Information pertaining to Purchase of bank drafts or pay orders or banker’s cheque in cash is reported by reporting entity in form 61A. Information pertaining to Purchase of prepaid instruments in cash is reported by reporting entity in form 61A. *40. Outward foreign remittance/purchase of foreign currency* Information of outward foreign remittance is reported by authorised dealer in form 15CC. Information about Remittance under LRS for educational loan taken from financial institutions mentioned in section 80E (Third proviso to Section 206C(1G)) is reported by authorised dealer through TCS form 27EQ for specified foreign remittances made by remitter PAN.Information about Remittance under LRS for purpose other than for purchase of overseas tour package or for educational loan taken from financial institution (Section 206C(1G(a))) is reported by authorised dealer through TCS form 27EQ for specified foreign remittances made by remitter PAN. *41. Receipt of foreign remittance* Information relating to payment of royalty or fees for technical services etc., paid to non- residents is reported by deductor in form 27Q. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. Information is reported by authorised dealer in form 15CC for foreign remittances made by remitter PAN. Information of receipt of foreign remittance by a remittee is reported by authorised dealer in form 15CC. *42. Foreign travel* Information is reported by deductor in TCS form 27EQ (quarterly statement). This information is provided by the collector to the taxpayer in Form 16D. Payment in connection with travel to any foreign country may be reported in Form 61 if the PAN is not furnished by the transacting party. PAN is populated based on aadhaar and other attributes of the person. *43. Purchase of immovable property* Information relating to immovable property is reported by the Property Registrar through SFT. The information will be shown in AIS of all buyers to enable submission of feedback. Buyer at the time of making payment towards purchase of property is liable to deduct tax from the amount paid to the seller subject to the threshold applicable. This information is reported in form 26QB. Seller of property reports the details of property buyer in schedule CG of ITR. Payment for purchase of immovable property may be reported in Form 61 if the PAN is not furnished by the transacting party. PAN is populated based on aadhaar and other attributes of the person. *44. Purchase of vehicle* Information is reported by deductor in TCS form 27EQ (quarterly statement). This information is provided by the collector to the taxpayer in Form 16D. Payment for purchase of motor vehicle may be reported in Form 61 if the PAN is not furnished by the transacting party. PAN is populated based on aadhaar and other attributes of the person. *45. Purchase of time deposits* Information relating to Purchase of Time deposits is reported by reporting entity (such as the bank) in the Statement of Financial Transaction (SFT). Information pertaining to investment in Time deposit is reported in Form 61 where PAN is not furnished by the transacting party. PAN is populated based on aadhaar and other attributes of the person. *46. Purchase of securities and units of mutual funds* Information is reported by reporting entity in the Statement of Financial Transaction (SFT). Purchase of shares (including share application money). Information is reported by reporting entity in the Statement of Financial Transaction (SFT). Information is reported by reporting entity (such as mutual fund companies) in the Statement of Financial Transaction (SFT). *47. Credit/Debit card* Information pertaining to application for issuance of credit/debit card is reported in Form 61 where PAN is not furnished by the transacting party. PAN is populated based on aadhaar and other attributes of the person. *48. Balance in account* Details of bank account other than saving and time deposits opened during the year , as reported in Form 61. Bank account with balance exceeding 50,000 at the closing of Financial year, as reported in Form 61. *49. Income distributed by business trust* Information relating to income from units of a business trust is reported by payer in form 27Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis and is chargeable to tax at special rate. *50. Income distributed by investment fund* This information is reported by the deductor in Form 26Q on a quarterly basis *So now incometax department knows more about you & you have to be very careful in next ITR filing plus proper records to be maintained by all for above list of items as anytime department will ask about it* #PersonalFinance

Srksagar

Adhithya

CREDIT SCORE While applying for any loan or credit card at the bank, the first thing that the bank will check is the customer’s creditworthiness through credit score. A credit score is the measure of the credit worthiness of a customer i.e., in simple words, it checks whether the customer has the ability to repay the borrowed money. Therefore, it is advised to maintain a good credit score. A credit score is a 3-digit number in the range of 300 to 900. It basically describes the credit merit of a person who has taken a loan or owns a credit card. Authorized lenders in India use the credit score calculated by 4 credit bureaus i.e., CIBIL TransUnion, Experian, Equifax, or CRIF High Mark to grant the loan. A credit score helps in analyzing the credit and repayment history, credit utilization, all the previous debts, and their tenure, etc. Although, in India, banks have their own limit of providing the loan but still if your credit score is above 900 then generally your chances of getting loan approval are higher. The majority of the banks and non-banking financial companies generally consider a credit score of 750 and above as an ideal score for granting a loan. How credit score is calculated? Each of the 4 credit bureaus as mentioned above uses its own algorithm for calculating the credit score. There are multiple factors that are considered for computing the credit score like payment history, credit type, and age, credit utilization. All these factors with their impact level on the credit score and history are explained below: Payment history: In this factor, your consistency of paying the bills and EMIs is looked at. This factor has a very huge impact on the credit score. Good payment history shows that your loan is at low risk of being a defaulter and you are a responsible borrower. It will help you in getting faster approvals and negotiations in interest rates. Missing the payments or paying late will lower the credit score. Credit utilization ratio: It is the second biggest factor that has a huge impact on the credit score. It is the ratio of the total credit amount used to the total available cumulative credit limit. It is calculated by dividing the overall outstanding balance of a customer by the total credit limit. To maintain a good score, it is generally advised by experts to use only 30% to 40% of the credit limit. Credit age: longer history of credits of the customer helps lenders in taking a well-informed decision. Therefore, credit age is also one of the factors that have a considerable amount of impact on the credit score. If you have a long credit history with timely payments then it will make you a responsible borrower as compared to the customer who has a very short credit history. Total number of accounts: Balancing the secured as well as unsecured credit is very important. A credit card is considered an unsecured credit while a car loan or a home loan is considered a secured credit. A balanced mix of both helps in good credit score, however, it has less impact as compared to other factors. Therefore, it is advised not to take only one type of loan in large quantity. Ways to Improve the credit score There are number of ways to improve your credit score. Some of the major ways of those are: Check your score report regularly: Sometimes it may happen that your credit score goes down despite good payment history. It may occur because of possible errors in the credit report like your loan is cleared but it is still showing in the report. Therefore, it is advised to go through the report regularly and check it for any discrepancies. Maintaining the older credit cards: Use the older credit cards to make stronger as well as lengthier credit history. A credit card account that is maintained for a longer period will always help in boosting the credit score. Diversifying the types of credit: To be on the safer side, build a balanced mix of credit with secured and unsecured loans. If you have not borrowed any money till now then you will not have any credit history and it may create an adverse impact on your credit score. Avoid racking up debts: a large number of loans at a time will put a negative impact on the credit score. Therefore, it is advised to take one loan at a time, clear it, and then take another loan. Overutilizing credit cards should also be avoided. A good utilization ratio is between 30% to 40%. #InvestmentIdeas #InvestingUniversity #PersonalFinance

Vinidhan

#PersonalFinance *50 Transactions to be reported in New Annual Information Statement (AIS)* *So be alert & careful in misuse of PAN Number* The Income Tax Department has announced the roll-out of a new statement namely Annual Information Statement (AIS) which would provide you with almost all details about your financial transactions during the year. So far, the Income Tax Department has been issuing Form 26AS to provide information related to taxable income and tax deducted at source (TDS), which will now be replaced with the Annual Information Statement (AIS). The new AIS statement will provide comprehensive information of the taxpayer and will be significantly useful while preparing the tax return. The information will be provided in AIS after removing duplicate information and taxpayers can download such information in PDF, JSON, CSV formats. A taxpayer can submit online feedback if the information is erroneous or refers to another person/year, or is duplicate Here’s the list of Top 50 Transactions to be reported in the New Annual Information Statement. *1.Salary* Employer submits detailed breakup of salary, perquisites, profits in lieu of salary etc paid to the employee in Annexure II of the TDS statement (24Q) of the last quarter. This information is also provided by the employer to the employee (taxpayer) in Part B (Annexure) of Form 16. AIS displays all the financial transactions such as, salary income, dividend income, interest income from saving/fixed deposits, sale and purchase of securities, etc. With the help of all such financial information, it would be easy for a taxpayer to report the correct information in the income tax return *2. Rent Received* Tenants responsible for paying rent are liable to deduct tax at source on payment of rent. Deductor reports details of amount paid/credited, date of payment, details of Tax deduction made etc. in Form 26Q. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. Tenant (Individual/HUF) paying a rent of more than 50,000 is liable to deduct tax while making payment to the landlord. Tenant reports details of rent paid amount paid/credited, property details, date of payment and tax deduction details etc. pertaining to rent paid in Form26QC. *3. Dividends* Dividend paid/declared by all companies (reporting entity) is reported under Statement of Financial Transactions (SFT). Company paying/distributing dividend is liable to deduct TDS from the amount paid subject to the threshold applicable in the act and report through form 26Q (quarterly statement). This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *4. Interest from savings bank* Interest paid/credited/accrued on saving account is reported under Statement of Financial Transactions (SFT). *5. Interest from deposit* Bank/deductor at the time paying/crediting interest on deposits is liable to deduct tax from deposit holder paid subject to the threshold applicable in the act. This information is reported by the Bank/deductor in form 26Q (quarterly statement). This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *6. Interest from others* Interest paid/credited/accrued on others (other than savings account, term deposit, recurring deposit) is reported under Statement of Financial Transactions (SFT). Bank/deductor at the time paying/crediting other interest (interest on securities) is liable to deduct tax from deposit holder paid subject to the threshold applicable in the act. This information is reported by the Bank/deductor in form 26Q (quarterly statement). This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A *7. Interest from income tax refund* Interest received on Income Tax Refund in the financial year is liable to be taxed as Income from other sources. *8. Rent on plant & machinery* Tenant paying rent is liable to deduct tax at applicable rate as per the Act from rent paid. Details of rent on Plant & Machinery is reported by the deductor in TDS form 26Q. Tenant furnishes the details of rent paid on quarterly basis. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *9. Winnings from lottery or crossword puzzle* Payer is liable to deduct tax at applicable rate as per act from winnings from lottery or crossword puzzle etc. Information about winnings is reported by payer in TDS form 26Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis. Income is taxable at special rate. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *10. Winnings from horse race* Payer is liable to deduct tax at applicable rate as per act from winnings from Horse race. Information about winnings is reported by payer in TDS form 26Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis and is chargeable to tax at special rate. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *11. Receipt of accumulated balance of PF from employer u/s 111* Employer/recognised provided fund reports information about accumulated balance due to an employee in form 26Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis and is chargeable to tax at special rate. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *12. Interest from infrastructure debt fund* Information relating to interest paid is reported by payer in form 27Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis and is chargeable to tax at special rate. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *13. Interest from specified company by a non-resident u/s 115A(1)(a)(iiaa)* Information relating to interest paid is reported by payer in form 27Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis and is chargeable to tax at special rate. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *14. Interest on bonds and government securities* Information relating to interest paid is reported by payer in form 27Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis and is chargeable to tax at special rate. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *15. Income in respect of units of non-resident u/s 115A(1)(a)(iiab)* Information about income in respect of units of Non Resident is reported by payer in form 27Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis and is chargeable to tax at special rate. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *16. Income and long-term capital gain from units by an offshore fund u/s 115AB(1)(b)* Information about income and long-term capital gain from units payable to an off shore fund is reported by payer in form 27Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis and is chargeable to tax at special rate. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *17. Income and long-term capital gain from foreign currency bonds or shares of Indian companies u/s 115AC* Information about income and long-term capital gain from foreign currency bonds or shares of Indian companies is reported by payer in form 27Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis and is chargeable to tax at special rate. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *18. Income of foreign institutional investors from securities u/s 115AD(1)(i)* Information about income of foreign institutional investors from securities is reported by payer in form 27Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis and is chargeable to tax at special rate. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *19. Insurance commission* Information about insurance commission received is reported by the payer in Form 26Q on a quarterly basis. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *20. Receipts from life insurance policy* Receipts from life insurance policy are exempt under section 10(10D) subject to conditions specified therein. If such conditions are not met, the receipts become taxable and tax is also deducted u/s 194DA. The information is reported by the payer in Form 26Q on a quarterly basis. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *21. Withdrawal of deposits under national savings scheme* Withdrawals from NSS are taxable. Tax is also deducted on such withdrawals and reported in Form 26Q by the payer on a quarterly basis. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *22. Receipt of commission etc. on sale of lottery tickets* Commission on lottery business is subject to tax deduction under section 194G. The payer reports such information in Form 26Q on a quarterly basis. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A *23. Income from investment in securitization trust* Income from investment made in securitization trust is subject to tax deduction. The payer reports such information in Form 27Q on a quarterly basis. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *24. Income on account of repurchase of units by MF/UTI* Receipt of income on account of repurchase of units by MF/UTI is subject to tax deduction under section 194F. The payer reports such information in Form 26Q on a quarterly basis. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *25. Interest or dividend or other sums payable to government* Income from interest or dividend or other sums payable is not subject to tax deduction. The payer reports such information in Form 26Q on a quarterly basis. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A *26. Payment to non-resident sportsmen or sports association u/s 115BBA* Information pertaining to amount paid to non-resident sportsmen or sports association is reported by deductor in form 27Q. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *27. Sale of land or building* Sales consideration of immovable property transferred is reported under Statement of Financial Transactions (SFT). The information will be shown in AIS of all sellers to enable submission of feedback. Sale of immovable property is also reported in Form 61 where PAN is not furnished by the transacting party. PAN is populated based on aadhaar and other attributes of the person. Information related to receipts under specified agreement is reported by person making payment for specified agreement entered into. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. *28. Receipts from transfer of immovable property* Information related to receipts from transfer of immovable property is reported by buyer of property in Form 26QB. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16B. *29. Sale of vehicle* Sale of motor vehicle is reported in Form 61 where PAN is not furnished by the transacting party. PAN is populated based on aadhaar and other attributes of the person. *30. Sale of securities and units of mutual fund* In the SFT reporting of depository transactions, the estimated sale consideration for the debit transaction is determined on the best possible available price of the asset with the depository (e.g. end of day price). The taxpayer will be able to modify the sales consideration and other related information before filing the return. In the SFT reporting of depository transactions, the estimated sale consideration for the debit transaction is determined on the best possible available price of the asset with the depository (e.g. end of day price). The taxpayer will be able to modify the sales consideration and other related information before filing the return. *31. Off market debit transactions* In the SFT reporting of depository transactions, the depository reports details of off market debit transactions. The value of transaction is computed on the basis of end of day price of the security. In case, the consideration is available, the same is also shown. *32. Off market credit transactions* In the SFT reporting of depository transactions, the depository reports details of off market credit transactions. The value of transaction is computed on the basis of end of day price *33. Business receipts* Information pertaining to amount paid to contractor is reported by contractee in form 26Q. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. Information pertaining to amount paid to the service provider is reported by recipient of services in form 26Q. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A *34. Business expenses* Information pertaining to purchase of alcoholic liquor is reported by tax collector in TCS form 27EQ (quarterly statement). This information is provided by the collector to the taxpayer in Form 27D. *35. Rent payments* Information is reported by person making payment in form 26QC. This information is provided by the deductor to the taxpayer in Form 16C *36. Miscellaneous payments* Information is reported by person making payment in form 26QD. This information is provided by the deductor to the taxpayer in Form 16D. Purchase of bank drafts or pay orders may be reported in Form 61 if PAN is not furnished by the transacting party. PAN is populated based on aadhaar and other attributes of the person *37. Cash deposits* Information pertaining to cash deposits in an account other than current account is reported by reporting entity in form 61A. The information will be shown in AIS of all account holders to enable submission of feedback. Information pertaining to cash deposits in current account is reported by reporting entity in form 61A. The information will be shown in AIS of all account holders to enable submission of feedback. *38. Cash withdrawals* Information pertaining to Cash withdrawals from current account is reported by reporting entity in form 61A. The information will be shown in AIS of all account holders to enable submission of feedback. Sometimes, cash withdrawals from accounts other than current account are reported by the Reporting Entity in SFT-004. The information will be shown in AIS of all account holders to enable submission of feedback. Information pertaining to Cash withdrawals is reported by reporting entity through TDS statement 26Q. This information is provided by the deductor to the taxpayer in Form 16A. *39. Cash payments* Information pertaining to Cash payments for goods and services is reported by reporting entity in form 61A. Information pertaining to Purchase of bank drafts or pay orders or banker’s cheque in cash is reported by reporting entity in form 61A. Information pertaining to Purchase of prepaid instruments in cash is reported by reporting entity in form 61A. *40. Outward foreign remittance/purchase of foreign currency* Information of outward foreign remittance is reported by authorised dealer in form 15CC. Information about Remittance under LRS for educational loan taken from financial institutions mentioned in section 80E (Third proviso to Section 206C(1G)) is reported by authorised dealer through TCS form 27EQ for specified foreign remittances made by remitter PAN.Information about Remittance under LRS for purpose other than for purchase of overseas tour package or for educational loan taken from financial institution (Section 206C(1G(a))) is reported by authorised dealer through TCS form 27EQ for specified foreign remittances made by remitter PAN. *41. Receipt of foreign remittance* Information relating to payment of royalty or fees for technical services etc., paid to non- residents is reported by deductor in form 27Q. This information is provided by the deductor to the deductee (taxpayer) in Form 16A. Information is reported by authorised dealer in form 15CC for foreign remittances made by remitter PAN. Information of receipt of foreign remittance by a remittee is reported by authorised dealer in form 15CC. *42. Foreign travel* Information is reported by deductor in TCS form 27EQ (quarterly statement). This information is provided by the collector to the taxpayer in Form 16D. Payment in connection with travel to any foreign country may be reported in Form 61 if the PAN is not furnished by the transacting party. PAN is populated based on aadhaar and other attributes of the person. *43. Purchase of immovable property* Information relating to immovable property is reported by the Property Registrar through SFT. The information will be shown in AIS of all buyers to enable submission of feedback. Buyer at the time of making payment towards purchase of property is liable to deduct tax from the amount paid to the seller subject to the threshold applicable. This information is reported in form 26QB. Seller of property reports the details of property buyer in schedule CG of ITR. Payment for purchase of immovable property may be reported in Form 61 if the PAN is not furnished by the transacting party. PAN is populated based on aadhaar and other attributes of the person. *44. Purchase of vehicle* Information is reported by deductor in TCS form 27EQ (quarterly statement). This information is provided by the collector to the taxpayer in Form 16D. Payment for purchase of motor vehicle may be reported in Form 61 if the PAN is not furnished by the transacting party. PAN is populated based on aadhaar and other attributes of the person. *45. Purchase of time deposits* Information relating to Purchase of Time deposits is reported by reporting entity (such as the bank) in the Statement of Financial Transaction (SFT). Information pertaining to investment in Time deposit is reported in Form 61 where PAN is not furnished by the transacting party. PAN is populated based on aadhaar and other attributes of the person. *46. Purchase of securities and units of mutual funds* Information is reported by reporting entity in the Statement of Financial Transaction (SFT). Purchase of shares (including share application money). Information is reported by reporting entity in the Statement of Financial Transaction (SFT). Information is reported by reporting entity (such as mutual fund companies) in the Statement of Financial Transaction (SFT). *47. Credit/Debit card* Information pertaining to application for issuance of credit/debit card is reported in Form 61 where PAN is not furnished by the transacting party. PAN is populated based on aadhaar and other attributes of the person. *48. Balance in account* Details of bank account other than saving and time deposits opened during the year , as reported in Form 61. Bank account with balance exceeding 50,000 at the closing of Financial year, as reported in Form 61. *49. Income distributed by business trust* Information relating to income from units of a business trust is reported by payer in form 27Q. Information is reported on quarterly basis and is chargeable to tax at special rate. *50. Income distributed by investment fund* This information is reported by the deductor in Form 26Q on a quarterly basis *So now incometax department knows more about you & you have to be very careful in next ITR filing plus proper records to be maintained by all for above list of items as anytime department will ask about it*

Sridhar Balakrishnan

WEEKEND GYAN #PersonalFinance *For kind attention of all the Joint FD holders* *Most of us have joint FDRs with “either or survivor” operational instruction. We feel that by having joint operational instruction, we will never face any operational difficulty in case of any contingency. Our general presumption is that the other surviving joint holder of FD will have the same operational powers as we enjoy when both of us are alive.* *But this assumption of ours is far away from the reality. In absence of correct knowledge of exact RBI guidelines, we simply believe that in case of death of any one of the joint FD holders, the surviving one can get it even pre- matured as per his/ her own convenience. Till yesterday morning, I was also under the same impression.* *This narration is based on the basis of difficulty faced by one of the FDR holder who shared his problem of not getting the FDRs of their parents pre- matured. I decided to help them in sorting out the matter and met the Bank manager along with that person to peruse him to allow the pre- maturity of FDS. But when the manager disclosed the RBI provisions regarding the pre- maturity of FDRs, I was bit surprised and even quite shocked also.* *As per RBI guidelines, in case of death of any one of the joint holder of FDR (even having valid nomination also), the surviving joint holder do not have free assess to the funds so as to get it pre- matured as per his/ her own will or choice. He/ she can get the final amount only at the time of final maturity of the FDR without any ones interference. Before maturity time, for getting it pre- matured, consent of all the legal heirs of deceased FDR holder is must.Means the joint holder do not enjoy the free authority to get the FDRs pre- matured. The surviving FD holder is entitled only at the time of regular maturity of the FDR and not before that.* *So, if we have long duration joint FDR, then in case of demise of one of the joint holder, the surviving one can not get the FDRs pre-matured without the consent of all the legal heirs of deceased one. This provision restrict the final authority of any surviving joint holder to use the funds freely in case of need. If any legal heir has any objection or not instantly available, the surviving FD holder will bound to wait till final maturity date or availability of all the legal heirs at a given time.* *Further never leave your joint holding FDR without nomination as he will be the one to claim the FDR proceeds in case of any contingency with both the FD joint holders, otherwise all the legal heirs will be required to claim the amont. One thing is very clear that here nominee is only the custodian of the Proceeds - not the owner of the amount so handed over to him/ her. If we wish to make the nominee as the sole claimant of FDR proceeds after our death, we should clearly mention this fact in our will also to avoid any future dispute.* *Hope knowledge of this important provision of RBI will help us in planning the management of our own funds for timely availability thereof at the time of real need.* *Note :- This opinion is based on real experience of one of the FDR holder.*

Sridhar Balakrishnan

Intrinsic Value

Are you a value Investor or you want to bevome one? If your answer is "Yes" to the above question, then please go through the below article to learn few great things from legend investors #InvestingUniversity #PersonalFinance #valueinvesting https://snhegdeinvestment.wordpress.com/2022/03/05/investment-lessons-learnt-from-legendary-investors-part-1/

Subrahmanya Hegde

Anupam Roongta

Anupam Roongta

Invest ₹1000 monthly and you'll be wealthier than 90% of the people. Invest 1 hour in learning and you'll be smarter than 90% of the people. Small steps each day. Big differences. #PersonalFinance

Anupam Roongta

Intrinsic Value

Anupam Roongta

As we are nearing end of Financial year, note these points to save Capital gains tax (Long term capital gains/loss = For holding period more than 1 year Short term capital gains/loss = For holding period less than 1 year) - 1 lakh profit in a Financial year is exempt as Long term capital gains. So book profits in shares & mutual funds together upto 1 lakh, and reinvest - If profits are more than 1 lakh, check if you can book loss in any of the holdings to set off. You can buy back the next day - Short term capital gains are taxed at 15%, book losses and buy back next day to set off any profits. - Both Long and short term losses can be carried forward for 8 years. So booking losses can help save future taxes. ( Make sure you file IT returns on time) - LTC losses can be set off against LTCG only. STC losses can be set off against ST and LT capital gains - Futures & Options profit /loss will be taxed along with normal tax slab #PersonalFinance #InvestingUniversity

Smart Option Trader

#PersonalFinance As we are nearing end of Financial year, note these points to save Capital gains tax (Long term capital gains/loss = For holding period more than 1 year Short term capital gains/loss = For holding period less than 1 year) - 1 lakh profit in a Financial year is exempt as Long term capital gains. So book profits in shares & mutual funds together upto 1 lakh, and reinvest - If profits are more than 1 lakh, check if you can book loss in any of the holdings to set off. You can buy back the next day - Short term capital gains are taxed at 15%, book losses and buy back next day to set off any profits. - Both Long and short term losses can be carried forward for 8 years. So booking losses can help save future taxes. ( Make sure you file IT returns on time) - LTC losses can be set off against LTCG only. STC losses can be set off against ST and LT capital gains - Futures & Options profit /loss will be taxed along with normal tax slab

Sridhar Balakrishnan

Anupam Roongta

Anupam Roongta

₹1 lac in your savings account will be ₹1.97 lacs in 25 years. ₹1 lac invested at 12% will be over ₹17 lacs in 25 years. You cannot save your way to wealth, you must invest. Period. #PersonalFinance #InvestingUniversity

Anupam Roongta

Anupam Roongta

"The Reserve Bank of India unexpectedly kept its key lending rates unchanged the reverse repo rate at 3.35% and repo rate at 4% and maintained its accommodative stance to support economic growth amid a hawkish turn by most global central banks" Vinidhan - The Student Investment Fund presents - The Weekly Wrap (13th February 2022) #InvestingUniversity #InvestmentIdeas #PersonalFinance Weekly Wrap_February 11 2022 (4).pdf - 805 KB #MacroEconomy

Vinidhan

The report for the Union Budget 2022-23, published by Vinidhan (GIM) - The Student Investment Fund of GIM, delves into the four main pillars of the Indian budget. The report examines the PM Gati Shakti, inclusive development, productivity enhancement & investment, and financing of investments. Peruse the report below for a complete understanding of the implications of the budget on the Indian economy. #InvestmentIdeas #InvestingUniversity #PersonalFinance Budget 23.pdf - 723 KB #MacroEconomy

Vinidhan

TAXATION During the pandemic, millions of young Indian investors have entered the stock market. According to NSE (National Stock Exchange) data, active investors in 2020 rose by 10.4 Mn, and now, more than 4% of the Indian population is investing in the stock market. Some people are now becoming full-time traders and some are considering it as a secondary source of income. Since trading in the stock market is a source of income for an individual and in India, filing ITR is mandatory for an individual if their income falls under the income tax slabs specified by the government. This income comes under the category of capital gains and business income. Capital gains are of two types; STCG (Short Term Capital Gains) and LTCG (Long Term Capital Gains). STCG is the income that an individual earns with the selling of the capital assets within one year of their holding. When the security transaction is applicable then STCG tax is applicable at 15%. But if the security transaction is not applicable, STCG tax is added automatically to the ITR of the taxpayer based on the income. On the other hand, LTCG is the income that an individual earns with the selling of the equity shares after one year of their holding. LTCG tax is applicable at 10% on the amount of gain over and above INR 1,00,000. Business income can also arise because of transactions done in futures and options. Apart from income from trading there are many other sources of income and depending on the type and amount of income the individuals are having and their income tax categories, the type of ITR forms varies. If the selected form is incorrect as per the rules, then the individual needs to file the ITR again. There are 7 types of ITR forms, hence, it is very important to know about each type of ITR form and which form is for whom. ITR1 or Sahaj This form should be filled by the Indian residents who fall under below categories: • Source of income can be either pension or salary. • Source of income is a single house property. In case of any loss from the previous year, exclusion is allowed. • Source of income is agriculture but less than INR 5,000. • The maximum limit of total generated income is INR 50 lakhs. • Any other sources of income like winning the lottery, etc. This form should not be filled by the individuals who fall under below categories: • The total generated income is more than INR 50,00,000. • The individual is having any taxable capital gains. • The source of income is more than one house property. • If there were any investments present in unlisted equity shares during the financial year. • NRI (Non-Resident Indian) and RNOR (Resident Not Ordinary Resident). • Source of income from agriculture is more than INR 5,000. • Source of income is any profession or business. • The individual is the director of any company. • The individual has any property outside India and generates income from that. • The individual is having any foreign assets or foreign income. It is for those individuals who do not earn income from STCG, LTCG, or business income. ITR 2 This form should be filled by the individuals and HUFs (Hindu Undivided Families) who fall under the below categories: • Income is greater than INR 50 lakhs. • Source of income can be either pension or salary. • Source of income is any house property. • Income generated from any other sources like winning the lottery, etc. • The individual is the director of any company. • Income from any agriculture source is greater than INR 5,000. • Income is generated from any capital gains. • If there were any investments present in unlisted equity shares during the financial year. • The individual is having any foreign assets or foreign income. A person earning STCG and LTCG from the sale of equity share and no income from business ( F&O ) shall file under ITR 2. This form should not be filled by individuals whose source of income is any profession or business. ITR 3 This form should be filled by the individuals and HUFs who fall under below categories: • The individual generates income through any profession or any proprietorship business. • If there were any investments present in unlisted equity shares during the financial year. • The individual has any partnership in any firm. • The individual is the director of any company. • The source of income is pension or salary, house property. • Business turnover is greater than INR 2 Cr. ITR 4 or Sugam This form should be filled by the HUFs, partnership firms, and individuals who are Indian residents and generating an income from any business or profession. Also, as per section 44AD, section 44ADA, and section 44AE of the Income Tax ACT 1961, the individuals who have chosen the presumptive income scheme of 6%/8% of turnover should fill this form. This form should not be filled by the LLPs (Limited Liability Partnerships). Also, the HUFs or individuals who are falling under below categories should not fill this form: • The total generated income is greater than INR 50 lakh. • If there are any losses carried forward from the previous years. • If the individual is holding a signing authority outside India. • If there were any investments present in unlisted equity shares during the financial year. • The individual is having any foreign assets or foreign income. • The source of income is more than one house property. • The individual is the director of any company. • NRI (Non-Resident Indian) and RNOR (Resident Not Ordinary Resident). Case 1- A person earning STCG and LTCG and income from F&O ( business income) but the turnover under the business head is less than INR 2 cr and the presumptive income is 8% of turnover. Then ITR 4 should be filed and presumptive income under section 44AD is calculated Case 2- A person earning STCG and LTCG and income from F&O ( business income) but the turnover under the business head is more than INR 2 cr or the presumptive income is less than 8% of turnover. Then ITR 4 should be filed and also tax audit has to be done under section 44AB and form 3CB and form 3CD (for assesse other than companies) has to be filed. ITR 5 This form should be filled by business trusts, AJP (Artificial Juridical Person), Investment funds, LLPSs, Estate of insolvent, AOPs (Associations of Persons), BOIs (Body of Individuals), and firms. ITR 6 This form should be filled by the companies that are not claiming for any exemptions under section 11. ITR 7 This form should be filled by the companies or individuals who have furnished returns under below sections: • Section 139(4A) • Section 139(4B) • Section 139(4C) • Section 139(4D) • Section 139(4E) • Section 139(4F) #PersonalFinance #InvestmentIdeas #InvestingUniversity

Vinidhan

"High Risk, High Return!" Let's decode this statement. Let's say you want to go from Jaipur to Delhi. But you don't know driving. Still, you get yourself in front of the steering wheel and start driving. Risk: Very very high Let's say you have a learner's license, you can drive on quiet roads but no highway experience! Risk? Moderately high. Or let's say you've experienced Kashmir to Kanyakumari, and you drive every day in the city. Risk? Low. Did you notice that the risk reduces with knowledge and experience + it gives good returns as well (you reach your destination on time) The same goes for stock investing. “Risk comes from not knowing what you're doing." - Warren Buffett So this is what actually happens: Higher the Knowledge Lower the Risk Higher the Return #PersonalFinance #InvestingUniversity

Anupam Roongta

Anupam Roongta

🌴Your emergency fund is not for “buying the dip”. 🦜Your emergency fund is for: - Emergencies - Preventing you from having to sell your investments during bad times 🦜No matter how great the opportunity is DO NOT invest your emergency fund in stock market. #NIFTY50 #PersonalFinance

Call Put Analyst

12 tricks Christopher H. Brown taught on value investing in book "the little book of value investing" Chris Brown is one of most successfull investor of all time who has worked with Ben graham, warren buffet, tweedy and other legendary investors of that time 1. Buy stocks when they are on sale- Instead of owning the darling of the day, focus on growth at reasonable price or value arbitrage. Growth is always available at value price at some point of time, all you have to do is look. 2. Calculate the worth- Stocks are not unlike houses or farm lands. Value investor should work like an investigator who appears from bank side to calculate its worth before approving loan. 3. Belts and suspenders approach- Margin of safety works like cushion which helps creating big wealth. Most of the companies increase their worth (intrinsic value) over time. But if some company doesnt, your cushion and diversification (min 10 no.) can save you. 4. Buy Low PE stocks. However take a good look of earnings which are reported for last 10 years. If a lot of fluctuation is found, better to calculate PE based on earnings below median of last 10 years. If earnings are consistant and increasing , simple PE helps a lot. 5. Buy a buck for 66 cents- Whenever sector or market is in down cycle, market cap is even below the net worth of company Calculate Book value (carefully) When Price/ Book value < 0.6 can be the time to load a lot of them. 6. Watch the guys in the know- when stock is undervalued and insiders (Big investors) are buying can be the simplest wealth creating combo. 7. Buying just because price is falling is not value investing- Dont try to catch an overvalued falling knife just because the stock was famous in recent past. 8. Create a "No thanks" pile Understand what is a bargain and what is not- No thanks pile -1 bad fundamental companies High debt Labor Union isssues Obsolescence due to new tech History related to fraud or criminal records 9. No thanks pile -2 Check the balance sheet and look at some ratios like Return on asset Current ratio Goodwill Intangible assets Debt/ Equity If you find something out of place /unreal Put the stock in "No thanks Pile" 10. No pile thanks-3 Check P&L sheet Sales growth + Gross profit margin + Depreciation (consistent) Extraordinary losses/profits - Pattern of earnings (cyclical or consistent) Consistent ROCE Other income - 11. Its the time in the market, not market timing, that counts. Its a marathon not a sprint Noble prize winner william sharpe found that a market timer (trader) must be right a staggering 82% of the time just to match a buy and hold return. That is impossible for most. 12. You can lead a horse to water but u can't make it drink. Value investing is straight fwd, most of the best investors and money manager come from this one style. All it takes is the courage to buy against  crowd, be odd one out and called different names when we are underperforming. #InvestingUniversity #PersonalFinance

Intrinsic Value

Srksagar

#PersonalFinance SOME FINANCIAL BASICS (MUST READ) : 1) Have an emergency fund of not less than 1 year of your expenses. 2) Insure: Term, medical, personal accident and fire insurance for your house. 3) Don’t use revolving credit on your credit cards. 4)Simplify: have two bank accounts, one credit card and one demat a/c. 5) Write a will. 6) Don’t borrow except for buying a house. 7) Ensure the value of the house is not more than 5 times your annual salary. 8) Create a corpus of not less than 30 times your annual expenses before considering retirement. 9) Spend less than you earn. 10) Try to save at least 30% of your salary. 11) Invest regularly. 12) Invest for long term; not less than 10 years, preferably 20 years or more. 13) Never stop your SIPs, especially in bear markets. 14) Never forget that all asset classes would always be cyclical. 15) Equity would provide the best return over long run than all other asset classes. 16) Follow portfolio diversification. 17) Follow asset allocation. 18) Have an advisor. The reward is worth the cost. 19) Check and review your portfolio only once a year. 20) More than your knowledge, it’s your behaviour which matters most for success in markets. 21) Come what may; always stay the course. *Thanks*

Sridhar Balakrishnan

Equity And Option Trader-display-image
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Reputation: 8,127  •  Aug 15 12:34 PM
Independence day 2022 | How much money do you need to be truly financially free?
Financial freedom can be achieved by following good financial habits, proper planning and investing.
Moneycontrol
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TRADE WiTH TREND -display-image
Reputation: 5,391  •  Aug 9 5:24 AM

1⃣ Rule of 72
No. of yrs required to double your money at a given rate, just divide 72 by interest rate.
If you want to know how long it will take to double your money at 8% interest, divide 72 by 8 and get 9 yrs.
At 6% rate, it will take 12 yrs
At 9% rate, it will take 8 yrs
2⃣R......read more
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Reputation: 19,485  •  Jul 20 1:27 AM

What if you buy a term plan in your 20s rather than in your 30s?
(this is assuming that you have dependent family members).
Here's how you can benefit by buying the term cover early:
➡️ Super-Low Premium
Buying the same 1 Cr term cover at age 25 will cost you lower premiums than......read more
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Suripeddi Koundinya-display-image
Reputation: 9,018  •  Jul 11 12:59 PM

Indian Income tax levies tax on individual taxpayers on the basis of a slab system. Slab system means different tax rates are prescribed for different ranges of income.

It means the tax rates keep increasing with an increase in the income of the taxpayer. This type of taxation e......read more
Personal Finance - 10464751
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Anupam Roongta-display-image
Reputation: 19,485  •  Jul 2 5:06 AM

When more is better:
➕ Sources of Income.
➕ Cash flows.
➕ Investments.
When less is better:
➖ Debt.
➖ Taxes.
➖ Monthly expenses.
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Nik-display-image
Reputation: 17,540  •  Jun 29 4:21 AM

Excerpts from The psychology of money: Morgan Housel.

1. Do the actions we take around our decisions on money depends on our knowledge about finance?
2. How do we change our decision making process around money which is based on our past experiences.
3. Luck and risk - what role......read more
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Shubham Birar-display-image
Reputation: 14,042  •  Jun 24 3:03 AM

💰 ELSS Vs PPF 💰

Equity-linked savings scheme Vs Public Provident Fund


💰 What are ELSS?
ELSS are Equity Linked Savings Scheme which is nothing but a tax-saving provident fund. It provides both features of tax savings and lo......read more
Mutual Funds - 10059184
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Reputation: 29,763  •  Jun 19 4:44 AM
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Anupam Roongta-display-image
Reputation: 19,485  •  Jun 18 8:32 AM

In 2032, you have:
➡️ Zero debt.
➡️ Fat retirement savings.
➡️ Big investment portfolio.
➡️ 3 passive income sources.
And it's all because of the actions you took in 2022.
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Reputation: 6,124  •  Jun 17 11:34 AM

🤔🚀How US Fed rate hikes can impact the Indian Economy?


The Federal Reserve of the United States (Fed) raised its benchmark interest rate by 75 basis points in June to combat the country's 40-year-high inflation.
This is th......read more
Macro Economy - 9922613
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Anupam Roongta-display-image
Reputation: 19,485  •  Jun 16 3:36 AM

Folding 0.1 mm thick sheet of paper 42 times will be enough to reach the Moon.
That's the power of compounding.
₹100 at 15% per annum for 10 years becomes ₹400.
₹1000 compounded again for the next 10 years becomes 4,000.
Just imagine if you compounded for 10 more years. You will ......read more
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Reputation: 6,124  •  Jun 12 10:20 AM

🤔 How I take a trade !!


Before entering any trade, it is critical to establish some set of rules that you must adhere to while in that trade. Depending on their trading style, these rules may differ from person to perso......read more
Personal Finance - 9796986
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Geranish-display-image
Reputation: 8,002  •  Jun 8 4:57 AM

TAXATION OF INCOME FROM EQUITY MARKET 📣

STCG (Short-Term Capital Gains)
• If equity shares listed on a stock exchange are sold within 12 months of purchase, the seller may make short term capital gain or incur a short-term capital loss. The seller makes short-term capital gain......read more
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Shubham Birar-display-image
Reputation: 14,042  •  Jun 5 5:41 AM

🌟 How much amount of my salary/income should I invest ❓🌟


Generally, a 50:30:20 rule is followed for managing our personal finance.

What is a 50:30:20 rule ❓
💰50% of your salary/income should be spent on your needs/dail......read more
Personal Finance - 9679536
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Reputation: 1,122  •  Jun 3 7:49 AM

Investment Ideas for individuals in their 20’s.💡 First steps!👣
1️⃣ Learn the basics : It is a true but sad fact that important subjects such as money, investing and personal finance are not taught a lot in school. So, we as individuals have to put in the time and effort to lear......read more
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Reputation: 9,808  •  May 25 10:44 AM

# INDIA economy
Unclaimed money of Indian public with GOI.. Safeguard your money by required steps...read more
Personal Finance - 9465212
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Anupam Roongta-display-image
Reputation: 19,485  •  May 12 5:44 AM

Why you will never be wealthy?
Potential reasons:
➡️ Buying a luxury car on EMI.
➡️ Inappropriate health insurance.
➡️ Prefer FDs over Equity.
➡️ No long term vision.
But HEELS can fix it:
Health Insurance cover = annual income or more.
Emergency Funds = 6-12 times of your monthl......read more
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Reputation: 3,679  •  Apr 27 10:42 AM

Pencilton introduces contactless RuPay card in the form of keychain #PersonalFinance
Personal Finance - 8930962
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Intrinsic Value-display-image
Reputation: 28,590  •  Apr 25 5:00 AM

It is easy to make 1Lakh from 50k. Even crypto hodlers did it.
Very hard to make 50 lakh from 25 Lakh
It needs behavioral strengths
a. courage to invest 25 Lakh
b. conviction to stay invested through thick and thin
c. confidence to not sell at 50-70% when you can make 10-15 Lakh
If you have not achieved the later, do not think about quitting ur jo......read more
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Sridhar Balakrishnan-display-image
Reputation: 193,914  •  Apr 21 5:49 AM
Top five tax saving investment options other than 80C
CA Amit Gupta, MD, SAG Infotech details five ways other than section 80C by which taxpayers can save on income tax.   The tax system offers a lot of opportunities to the taxpayers to reduce their taxable income, but most of the taxpayers focus only on availing the deduction of Rs 1.5 lakh available under Section 80C. Less awareness could be the reason, but by knowing about all those tax-saving opportunities, every taxpayer can reduce more taxes they pay. In this article,...
Dalal Street Investment Journal
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Vinidhan-display-image
Reputation: 7,885  •  Apr 20 5:42 AM

SLBM (Stock Lending and Borrowing Mechanism) is a legally approved medium for lending and borrowing securities. It is a system in which a trader can borrow shares that they do not already own or lend the stocks they own. All market participants, including retail (except Qualified......read more
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Reputation: 19,485  •  Apr 15 8:40 AM

Some people don't like numbers.
But tracking these basic numbers is an essential part: 👇
➡️ Keep a track of assets v/s debt, plot a chart in excel if you have a loan.
➡️ Keep a track of your saving rate.
Savings Rate = Monthly Savings / Monthly Earnings
➡️ Keep a track of your i......read more
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Vinidhan-display-image
Reputation: 7,885  •  Apr 12 10:43 AM

LIFE INSURANCE

Life insurance is a policy or cover that allows the policyholders to ensure financial independence for their family members after death. Assume you are the sole provider for your family, supporting your spouse and children.
Your death would financially devastate t......read more
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Srksagar-display-image
Reputation: 64,752  •  Apr 10 2:29 AM

*50 Transactions to be reported in New Annual Information Statement (AIS)*
*So be alert & careful in misuse of PAN Number*
The Income Tax Department has announced the roll-out of a new statement namely Annual Information Statement (AIS) which would provide you with almost all de......read more
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Reputation: 1,323  •  Apr 10 3:52 AM
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Reputation: 7,885  •  Apr 9 9:51 AM

CREDIT SCORE

While applying for any loan or credit card at the bank, the first thing that the bank will check is the customer’s creditworthiness through credit score. A credit score is the measure of the credit worthiness of a customer i.e., in simple words, it checks whether th......read more
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Sridhar Balakrishnan-display-image
Reputation: 193,914  •  Apr 9 7:44 AM

*50 Transactions to be reported in New Annual Information Statement (AIS)*
*So be alert & careful in misuse of PAN Number*
The Income Tax Department has announced the roll-out of a new statement namely Annual Information Statement (AIS) which would provide you ......read more
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Sridhar Balakrishnan-display-image
Reputation: 193,914  •  Apr 9 1:51 AM

WEEKEND GYAN
*For kind attention of all the Joint FD holders*
*Most of us have joint FDRs with “either or survivor” operational instruction. We feel that by having joint operational instruction, we will never face any operational difficulty in case of any contin......read more
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Learn and Earn SMCC-display-image
Reputation: 1,918  •  Apr 9 7:24 AM

The words “saving” and “investing” are sometimes used interchangeably, but a general rule of thumb is saving should be short-term while investing should be long-term.
If you are not doing either, the time to get started is now.
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Reputation: 28,590  •  Apr 7 3:40 AM
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Subrahmanya Hegde-display-image
Reputation: 164  •  Apr 6 7:56 AM
Investment Lessons Learnt from Legendary Investors – Part 1
We have to learn a lot to become successful in the Investment/Stock Market journey, but we can learn in many ways and the most effective one is by making mistakes or through experience. But you kno…
Decoding Value Investment

Are you a value Investor or you want to bevome one?
If your answer is "Yes" to the above question, then please go through the below article to learn few great things from legend investors
https://snhegdeinvestment.wordpress.c......read more
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Anupam Roongta-display-image
Reputation: 19,485  •  Apr 6 5:19 AM

Never make finanacial decisions based on sudden emotional outburst.
Personal Finance - 8570152
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Reputation: 19,485  •  Apr 3 9:32 AM
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Sridhar Balakrishnan-display-image
Reputation: 193,914  •  Apr 2 3:28 AM
ITR filing: Income tax department notifies new forms for FY23. Details here
Income tax department has notified ITR forms 1 to 6 for the financial year 2022-23
mint
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Reputation: 19,485  •  Mar 31 10:31 AM
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Anupam Roongta-display-image
Reputation: 19,485  •  Mar 27 5:53 AM

Invest ₹1000 monthly and you'll be wealthier than 90% of the people.
Invest 1 hour in learning and you'll be smarter than 90% of the people.
Small steps each day.
Big differences.
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Intrinsic Value-display-image
Reputation: 28,590  •  Mar 24 7:47 AM

There are some people having big flats in metro cities and audi cars but in reality everything is bought from debt.
and then there are people who own small homes in tier 2 cities, small cars but without any debt and they own good amount of ownership of businesses.
Those who dont ......read more
Personal Finance - 8337297
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Reputation: 19,485  •  Mar 24 6:54 AM
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Reputation: 11,231  •  Mar 23 5:42 AM
Tax loss harvesting opportunity for fiscal year (FY) 2021-22 – Z-Connect by Zerodha
Traders, If you hold stocks or mutual funds in your portfolio that have unrealised losses, you can set off these losses against realised profits, on which you have to pay taxes. To do this, you can book the losses, effectively reducing the realised gains and hence also reducing the tax payable. This act of booking […]
Z-Connect by Zerodha

If you have realized capital gains on which you have to pay taxes, you can reduce your tax outgo by selling any holdings which are in losses before March 31st. This is also called Tax-Loss Harvesting. We have a report on Console that shows you the losses that can be harvested.

......read more
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Reputation: 5,872  •  Mar 21 12:02 PM

As we are nearing end of Financial year, note these points to save Capital gains tax
(Long term capital gains/loss = For holding period more than 1 year
Short term capital gains/loss = For holding period less than 1 year)
- 1 lakh profit in a Financial year is exempt as Long te......read more
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Sridhar Balakrishnan-display-image
Reputation: 193,914  •  Mar 16 3:31 AM

As we are nearing end of Financial year, note these points to save Capital gains tax
(Long term capital gains/loss = For holding period more than 1 year
Short term capital gains/loss = For holding period less than 1 year)
- 1 lakh profit in a Financial year is......read more
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Reputation: 19,485  •  Mar 11 5:14 AM
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Reputation: 19,485  •  Mar 6 5:35 AM
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Anupam Roongta-display-image
Reputation: 19,485  •  Mar 5 7:40 AM

₹1 lac in your savings account will be ₹1.97 lacs in 25 years.
₹1 lac invested at 12% will be over ₹17 lacs in 25 years.
You cannot save your way to wealth, you must invest.
Period.
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Reputation: 19,485  •  Mar 3 8:08 AM
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Reputation: 19,485  •  Feb 25 7:37 AM

Experiences always speak louder. Learn, attempt, fail and grow.
Personal Finance - 7831714
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Bharat Wealth Group-display-image
Reputation: 521  •  Feb 20 2:43 AM
How to build your mutual fund portfolio from scratch
It’s always a good idea to have goal-specific portfolios
Moneycontrol
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Reputation: 7,885  •  Feb 13 4:12 AM

"The Reserve Bank of India unexpectedly kept its key lending rates unchanged the reverse repo rate at 3.35% and repo rate at 4% and maintained its accommodative stance to support economic growth amid a hawkish turn by most global central banks"

Vinidhan - The Student Investment ......read more
Weekly Wrap_February 11 2022 (4).pdf
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